Home of Ane Ryan Walker, Teller of Tall Tales, Writer of Short Stories

Tag: writing craft (Page 1 of 8)

How old is too old to start?

Nobody grows old merely by living a number of years. We grow old by deserting our ideals. Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul.

― Samuel Ullman

Is it too late to start writing that novel you always dreamed about? I don’t think so. In fact I know it’s never too late, unless you’re dead. Once that happens there isn’t much to be done. Unless you believe in reincarnation, or you plan on becoming a Zombie or a Vampire. Who knows, maybe you do plan on one of those two things happening to you.  If not, you may be wasting your time.

I truly don’t think Dracula will be around to revive you once you have infinite amounts of time on your hands.  Really, even if you have all of eternity at your disposal, you will most likely find a way to squander the time, just like you did in real life.

For most of us, aspiring writers that is, we tend to fixate on all the wrong things, thus delaying our inevitable success.

No Fear?

Know Fear!

That’s the aspiring authors beginning motto. We become so entrenched in the things we don’t know, (shameful at your age) that we fail to realize what we do know. What is that, you’re asking? Life!

There are stages to life beyond growth and development, the same way mourning has stages to get us to our end result.

In your 2o’s: Too busy having fun and thinking I already know everything I will ever need to know, plus enjoying the delusion of immortality.

In your 30’s: Very busy convincing yourself you have barely scratched the surface of life and have nothing to gain by introspection.

In your 40’s: 1st OMG moment. I have a family, and husband, children and other extended family members and they all want something from me. What was I thinking?????

In your 50’s: I will be able to retire in a mere 10+ years and then my time will be my own. I can travel, sleep, eat, enjoy fine wine, and I will not have to answer to anyone.

In your 60’s: 2nd OMG moment. This is all falling apart! I didn’t realize the government wants me to work until I’m decrepit at 67+ years old. I didn’t start saving for my retirement when I was young and had money. I will now be too old to do anything I want to do and will probably become a Greeter at Walmart for the paycheck.

In your 70’s: If I had written a single page a day for a single year I would have finished a book by now.

Life lesson?Image result for clip art halloween

Yes! It is never too late to start (unless you’re already dead).

Writing with enthusiasm

Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.

― Helen Keller

Sometimes, just when we first set out to be writers, we grope around in the dark, we stumble and many of us fall.  Some fall completely off the path.  I believe that happens to aspiring writers who do not know you must write a million words before you find your true voice.

Some of us are fortunate and are born storytellers.  Some of us work very hard to learn the craft.  And many of the writers that I know, the ones who are wise, recognize the pursuit of learning craft in terms of writing fiction is a life long endeavor.

The most difficult task associated with writing is the endurance it takes to stay with it.

Simple and yet profound, the writer who is most successful is the one who endures.

You should write everyday.  It doesn’t need to be an epistle, it just needs to be writing.  A journal entry, a simple thought, a set block of time dedicated to a specific project, or a few moments of reminiscing.   These practices become habits.  Habits lead to routines, and the routine of writing is where you find your voice.

But, in order to achieve this success, you must practice. Sit down to write with the belief that you can achieve the goals you set. Approach the building of this routine with hope and confidence, and reap the reward of success.

When you advance your cause by carrying forward with faith and confidence, you do not achieve the success you seek. Your true voice lives within the self you share in your writing. So write to find it.  Surprise yourself.

What writers do

Writer’s write. This is what I’ve been told since the first day I declared my intention to tell the stories inside me.

It sounded so simple. You have a story, and you should tell it. Just sit down and write. Simple and straight forward. If only it were that easy. But it’s not. Whether you write for a living or simply to still the small voices inside you which compel you share the story you know, it is never easy.

The worst part, always, is knowing where to start. Most of us don’t know where the story begins with any more certainty than you do where every story begins. That being said, let me assure you every story is unique. There is no right or wrong answer about where to start.

Regardless of the advice you read, and the opinions are numerous, where the story begins is a matter of choice and style. You will learn how to choose what works for you as a writer, and style develops over time. I’ve heard it said you need to write a million words before you find your voice.

No matter what type of fiction you choose, writing a salable compelling novel is difficult. The fiction market is  highly competitive, and to succeed in the marketplace, even if you choose self publishing, you will need to know the fundamentals of good writing.

What you need to demonstrate is a good hook to engage your reader and compelling plot points to keep them engaged in the story. Then you will need to write sharp and tight to keep your story appealing to the audience.

Developing the opening hook is as simple as writing a sentence and as difficult as summing up the entire premise of the story in a few short words. Great opening lines create a question in the readers mind that needs to be answered. That need is what keeps them reading. The need to find out how the characters arrived at this moment and what happened to them. But more importantly what will happen next?

Hooks are also used to close scenes and chapters. These scene and chapter endings being the opportunities for a reader to take a break and put your book down. If you don’t want that to happen, then ensure that you’ve posed and important question as to what happens next?

Don’t worry about spending too much time on that opening, because for the most part, other than writing, most writers re-write. And it is not only likely, but highly probable, that re-writing is in your future.  If you don’t master the opening on the first pass (And I bet you won’t) you will have plenty of opportunities to re-write then opening into a fine tuned and lethal hook. Because the thing most writers spend their time on is re-writing and editing.

What’s in a name?

I recently had a visit from a long time friend I had not seen in several years. During the catch-up phase of our conversation, she informed me she had rescued two dogs. Being a dog lover myself, of course, I needed more information. “What breed,” I asked. She replied, “mixed.”

Finally, she got to the point and told me the mix of breeds–Chihuahua, and Yorkie. “Chorkies,” she declared.

I thought about it for a few moments, all the time wondering to myself who chooses how names are combined to determine a mix of breeds. Chorkie is a fine choice, but what’s wrong with Yohuahua? Isn’t that also an acceptable combination of Yorkie and Chihuahua?

Other options for mixed breeds, such as Labrador retriever and Poodle, are Labradoodle. Let me offer another option; Poodor retriever. After all, the dog is probably still willing to retrieve things.

Some other options I think may need revision.

  • Bogle – Beagle and Boxer. My suggestion, Beaxer, pronounced Beazer. Much more interesting.
  • Bugg – Boston Terrier and Pug. My take is Terrug. Interesting.
  • Cheagle – Chihuahua and Beagle. much like the Yorkie mix, I would go with Behuahua. Sounds like Bwaaahhhaaaa!
  • Golden Dox – Golden Retriever and Dachshund. Or a Golden hund, you pick.
  • Horgi – Husky and Corgi. This is just mean, who would be so mean to a Husky?
  • Jack-A-Ranian – Jack Russell Terrier and Pomeranian. How about PomTerr?
  • Lhaffon – Brussels Griffon and Lhasa Apso. Laff off, just for ridiculousness.
  • Cavachon – Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Bichon Frisé. Charles Frise’. It’s a little more personal.

So thinking further on the subject I began to wonder, what’s in a name?

Romance authors choose Hero names with a sharp sound, Brick, Dirk, Clint, or Zack, no Tommies for us. We like real men with hard-sounding names who are durable and dependable.

And for Heroines, we choose languorous, sleep-inducing, sloe-eyed names with a musical lilt, Harmony, Cherie, Susannah. The more ladylike and sultry the name, the better for our heroines. Sexy, huh?

Anewyn, Gaelic for the blithe spirit, gets shortened to Ane and many people spend years pointing out your name is spelled wrong. Over the years I respond, my parents needed the second “N” for another child. Because of obvious criticisms from people you don’t really know, who are not in possession of all the facts, this is annoying at best. You should try to meet these situations with humor.

Generally, I do.

See the list of mixed breed names, revised.

 

 

Self Doubt

Doubt is a virus that attacks our self-esteem, productivity, and confidence. Faith that you and your life are perfectly unfolding is the strongest vaccine.
― Sean Stephenson

Sometimes I question whether or not I should continue to pursue a writing career. I have so many stories to tell, but I get distracted so easily. I wonder if I’m serious about writing, and that is not a good feeling.

Maybe, I thought, I just need a little time off. You know how it goes. Thinking I’ll take a little time, ease into the next phase of where my life journey is taking me and determine how serious I really am about this writing thing.

First I think, NANO is coming up and this is the perfect opportunity to establish a new habit, i.e., writing every day. Oh, wait! I had that habit and for some unknown reason, I stopped writing every day. Even now, I wonder why.

Was it because things didn’t go exactly as planned?  Because I failed to get my butt in the chair and just do it?

Some people believe you shouldn’t try to write every day. There I said it, and if you believe it fine, and if you don’t, that’s okay too.

Right now I’m not sure. I know that I made a commitment to turn in critique pages today. I follow through on the promises I make. I always try, an I’ consistent.

Also, through this last hiatus, I realized the value of time off from writing. Some times writers, like stories, need a rest.

Sure it was surgery and drug-induced vacation that got me into the “not writing” mode. Enough to make me wonder if going back to writing was worth the energy. I did doubt it on many days.

This morning I woke up with a whole new attitude. I do want to write, I do have stories to tell, and I find storytelling a pleasure. But, at a different pace.

We are now nine days into NANO, and I’m not there. SO what I’m doing is looking at reviving abandoned stories. Yeah, that’s the reason I decided writing is worth it. So many stories, so little time.

Happy writing, and keep the commitments you make. You’ll be happier for it.

Where does your story start?

There’s the sixty-four thousand dollar question.

I know many authors in various stages of their careers, and not a single one willing to say, “I know exactly where my story begins.”

Once in a rare while we know where to start the story, but not often, and certainly, not always.

As writers we have so many things to agonize over, such as “who does the story belong to?”, and “who will be the primary character?”

We need to decide so many things when we start a new story that we often overlook the obvious when we decide who will tell the story. For Romance writers, we know the story must be told by both sides, the “he said, she said” that keeps romance readers coming back. They love (no pun intended) a gripping story and so of course, they want to know why she behaved that way, and what he thought about it, and why he put the time and energy into winning her back. Did she make it worth his time?

If you have an audience that comes back again and again, you know you’re probably telling the story correctly. But how much do you agonize over the very beginning of the story? How do you decide when you’re just starting out who the story belongs to and how it should be told.

A general rule of thumb is when things change, the story begins. Always a good place to start. Change brings conflict. Conflict and its resolution or lack thereof, is often what keeps readers reading. But, unless we can identify and sympathize with the primary character, then you, as the reader are not likely to buy in for the long haul. And believe me, 400 pages is the long haul.

You must create and open with a character we love, or at least can identify with for the duration of the story. This simple direction is indeed a tall order.
How do I make you love my character? Or at the very least, how do I get you to accept him for who he is, like you but not like you, and still make him interesting.

In a word, backstory.

All of the things I, as the writer know, about the character, who he or she is, how they came to be in the moment fraught with conflict and change, and I must make you care about him and want to know why that happened.

You can love him or hate him, but he must arouse your curiosity, make you ask why? and also wonder, what happened next?

If you fail to incite this interest, you haven’t found the the right character, or the true beginning of your story.

What you don’t know. . .

 

  “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

― Albert Einstein

So there’s a saying: “You don’t know what you don’t know until you know it. Then you know.”

Pretty much I believe that to be true. When you attempt to learn a new skill, you have no idea–for the most part–if learning will be drastic, difficult, or if you will fall into it like an old pro.

This saying is especially true when you talk about learning to write. Each of us has, at one time or another, met a person who thinks writing a book is a great idea. Sometimes they even tell us they’re going to go home and write it and it’ll be out next year.

I tend to believe this where the person who believes anyone can write a book finds out what they don’t know. Especially when it comes to writing a book.

So it is pretty easy to accept that each of us has a story to tell. That some of us are “born” storytellers. What about the authors that aren’t “born” storytellers? They must have learned something about storytelling.  Do they study the craft of writing, or do they observe other writers?

Some writers can’t tell you how they craft a story, because they work by instinct. The old tribal belief that stories are meant to be shared, that cautionary tales are for all of us, and sometimes we just need to entertain the rest of the tribe, is absolutely true. What motivates each writer is different, unique in its own way.

If you have a story to tell, write it down. If you’re willing to take a leap of faith and learn something new, share it with others, selectively. I stress selectively because not all critics are kind.

Chose critics who will not only tell you what’s wrong with specificity, but can suggest ways to fix it. This is how we learn.

 

 

About Writer’s Block

  “You don’t make progress by standing on the sidelines, whimpering and complaining. You make progress by implementing ideas.”

― Shirley Chisholm

Writers write. Ask any writer. If they could stop writing, they probably would stop writing. For the rest of us, we write to still the voices in our heads. We write to get our stories out into the world.We write, publish, and repeat the process. Endlessly.

If you ask me about that thing known as “writers block”, I’ll tell you it doesn’t exist. I can pretty much prove it. No other profession allows its practitioners to claim that no work can be accomplished today, tomorrow, this week, next week, or anytime in the near future, because they are suffering from a “block”.

Plumbers block? No. Dentist Block? No. Nurses Block? No. Accounting Block? No.

Trust me, if you are a writer and you’re not writing it’s because you choose not to write.

But wait, you say. I really do have writers block. What can I do? The answer is simple. It’s a choice you make, either a form of procrastination to avoid criticism, rejection, or some other form of negativity. So, you ask, how can I fix that? Start writing. Yes, that’s right. Make a plan and stick with it. Just start writing.

Writing when you have fear is difficult. Fears need to be faced in order for you to overcome them. So of course, the answer is simple. Start  writing.

Having difficulty with your story? Keep writing. Many writers know, you can not fix a blank page, so fill the page, then worry about fixing it later. Nobody–or let me say rarely–does anyone love a first draft. Usually it takes a lot of work, self editing, story restructuring, critiquing, and professional editing to get a story into decent shape.

Did I mention the upside of continuing to write in the face of adversity (i.e, laziness, fear, procrastination, martyrdom, or anything else that prevents you from writing)is you will find your true voice and your writing will improve if you just keep writing.

Write What You Know

  “Both desire and imagination are stored in the mind of the individual and when stretched, both have the potential to position a person for greatness.”

― Eric Thomas

Storytellers who write what they know…what they have experienced, what they have observed in others, what they have lived through, and what they deal with on an ongoing basis are the people who write what they know.

You can tell as soon as you start reading, you’re engaged in the story. This person is someone who writes from their soul. Their grammar and punctuation need not be perfect, but still,  you get them. More importantly, they get you.

When, as writers we reach down to the core of who we truly are, we find the truth of our existence. What we call our core story. No matter how many ways we find to tell our story, successful writers never search for a theme. They know their core story and they are successful because they tell it over and over again.

So, how do we recognize our core story? We know it, instinctively from our formative years. Think about it. When you first became interested in story. As children, we all had our favorites. Stories, that is. We had one thing we couldn’t get enough of, a book or story or a type of story we would read over and over again and again.

For many mystery writers it was Nancy Drew, or the Hardy Boys. For me, it was Cherry Ames, Student Nurse. For writers who pursue adventure stories it was usually something like, Robin Hood. Our taste in reading is often a hint to our preference in writing–the type of story that we know and love to tell, over and over again.

Truth or Power?

  “All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.”

― Friedrich Nietzsche

So all the rules you can’t seem to help breaking today which will land you in plenty of hot water maybe perfectly acceptable tomorrow.  Just go with it. Things change. If you can wait around long enough.

When we begin our trip down the path to published author, we first need to learn the rules. Excellent advice. I cannot stress how important it is the know the rules before you break them. Only then can you justify the unique twist applied to individual voice.

My best advice is to go ahead and write through to the end. The end of the first (rough) draft.

Then, when the first draft is complete your real work begins. What do I mean by real work? Well, for starters, editing. What kind of editing you ask? Good question. Editing in and of itself, can be considered an art form.

There is Developmental editing. This editing looks at the overall story. How did you structure the story you wrote? Is it logical? Does it follow a linear timeline? Does it make sense? Does it have all the components of a good story, in a logical fashion which will most likely cause your readers to pick up your book, and keep reading through to the conclusion.

Developmental editing is very expensive, and it is not the kind of editing you can do for yourself. Often we ask critique partners to assist us with line editing, and Beta reads. Not your best choice. As far as critique partners go, they make great critique partners or we wouldn’t keep them as critique partners. Most writers–especially those who take themselves seriously–have beta readers lined up. Those are folks who 1) like to read, 2) will be honest about the material they read, 3)have some idea of what makes a good story. At least look for Beta readers who have a clue about what makes a story good and what make it fail story-wise.

Line editing is exactly as it reads. An editor, who you pay, or your publisher pays, goes through your manuscript line by line looking for typos, grammar errors, (such as their for they are, or where for wear, etc.)and other inconsistencies. A character who is short  in chapter one who towers over others in chapter three, or might have blue eyes for several chapters which mysteriously change to green eyes in the end of the book.

Copy editing is done by the truly anal retentive. A copy editor’s job is to make sure you adhere to the house style designated by your publisher. Check submission guidelines. Submission guidelines as laid out by the publisher, will commonly indicate “house style”. Often the Chicago Manual of Style is indicated as the standard. The copy editor is the one who will help you to “tighten” your story. They help you to remove the unnecessary words, those which drag your manuscript down, making it harder to read, or slower to read.

Acquisitions editor is the employee of the traditional publisher who sees your project (book) through to completion. They buy your book. Which means, they sold your book to the sales team and the editorial board,but that’s a story for another time, another blog.

That’s about it for now, unless you plan to use and editor for SEO. For those of you scratching your heads, Search Engine Optimization. Because, when someone goes looking for your book, you need to help them find it.

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